Anglophones Francophones in Quebec opposed Bill 96 bilingualism angus Reid

Anglophones and Francophones in Quebec are diametrically opposed on Bill 96

Francophones believe Bill 96 is about protecting people who speak French; Anglophones believe it’s about punishing those who don’t.

According to a recent study by Angus Reid on bilingualism, Francophones and Anglophones are almost completely diametrically opposed on Bill 96. Francophones in Quebec generally believe (80%) that Bill 96 is about protecting people who speak French, while Anglophones believe (89%) it’s about punishing those who don’t.

Bill 96, or “An Act respecting French, the official and common language of Québec,” as it’s known legislatively, was introduced by the CAQ on May 13 in order to strengthen the French language in the province.

“Ultimately, when framed by the contrasting narratives built around each community, whether Bill 96 offers promise or peril varies dramatically depending on where you’re standing. This much is reflected in how different linguistic communities perceive the intent of Bill 96.

“Of course, missing in both these narratives are the experiences of allophones and Indigenous peoples — both of which it could be argued are overlooked when Canadian history is construed as one built on two linguistic solitudes. Indeed, as the leader of the Kanesatake Mohawk community in Quebec pointed out earlier this summer, Indigenous peoples understand all too well what it means to have to fight for your language and culture when surrounded by a much larger population.”

—Angus Reid Institute
Anglophones and Francophones in Quebec are diametrically opposed on Bill 96

For the complete poll results and methodology, please visit the Angus Reid Institute website.


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