quebec edible cannabis poutine gravy

We tried cannabis poutine gravy from the SQDC, possibly the ultimate Quebec edible

“The SQDC has quietly but surely increased their edible section. It’s still a little unconventional, but you can now get ramen, beef jerky, little sausages — and THC-infused poutine gravy.”

It’s hard to be an edible consumer in Quebec without feeling a little left out. In other provinces, the selection and strength of their offerings seem to be in limitless supply. They’ve got candies, colas and so much more. Here, we made international headlines by picking foods no child would mistake for something fun, like beets and cauliflower. Our supposedly progressive province remained behind the times on weed.

But credit where it’s due, the SQDC has quietly but surely increased their edible section. It’s still a little unconventional, but you can now get ramen, beef jerky and little sausages. 

And of course, this being Quebec, they’re now selling THC-infused poutine gravy. It comes courtesy of 1964 and sells for $7.90 for two packets, which look like little Keurig capsules. There’s 5 mg of THC and trace amounts of CBD per packet, so you might need to add a few just to feel anything.

Now how does it taste? For this taste test, we didn’t cheat by adding the cannabis gravy to a poutine with great components already: it had to stand on its own with McCain Superfries and grocery store cheese curds. We also went with four packets for three people, so about 7 mg per person.

The texture of the gravy gets high marks: it was thick and smooth after coming to a simmer on the stove. Like any powdered gravy, you just mix it in water and bring it to a slow boil.

On the first bite, there’s a slightly detectable aftertaste that edible fans are probably familiar with. But after a couple of bites, it was gone. We didn’t enhance the flavour at first, but eventually added pepper to give it a little more oomph. The sauce flavour is mild, but at least it tastes like poutine gravy and not weed.

So consistency and flavour-wise, the cannabis gravy gets a passing grade. By no means the best poutine gravy you’ll ever have, but comparable to the grocery store brands. Other comparisons: school cafeteria poutine, taking one puff before eating a regular poutine, Toronto poutine.

What about afterwards? Dining guest one started to feel a faint buzz come on quickly — about ~30 mins afterwards — but it faded just as fast. Dining guest two never felt a thing. Dining guest three (yours truly) felt normal at first, but I soon found myself cackling maniacally at the Obscurest Vinyl TikTok page, so the proof was in the pudding. I’m also a lightweight and 15 mg gummies can pack a punch lasting a couple of hours. Not this time around.

The biggest question here is probably price. A regular poutine gravy runs you about $2 at the grocery store, and a poutine at some fast food spot won’t cost you an arm and leg, either. Is, in this case, $16 worth of THC gravy packets worth it for a fairly insubstantial high? If you pair it with a THC-infused beverage or top it with those aforementioned sausages, maybe you’ll get in more of a zone. Some things to consider if you decide to have a homemade THC poutine night, which I would recommend you do at least once, if only to say you consumed an edible in the most Quebec fashion.

We tried cannabis poutine gravy from the SQDC, possibly the ultimate Quebec edible

For more on the Quebec edible selection and cannabis poutine gravy, please visit the SQDC website.


For our latest in news, please visit the News section.